HIST 119 - Lecture 18 - "War So Terrible": Why the Union Won and the Confederacy Lost at Home and Abroad

Lecture 18 - "War So Terrible": Why the Union Won and the Confederacy Lost at Home and Abroad

Overview

This lecture probes the reasons for confederate defeat and union victory. Professor Blight begins with an elucidation of the loss-of-will thesis, which suggests that it was a lack of conviction on the home front that assured confederate defeat, before offering another of other popular explanations for northern victory: industrial capacity, political leadership, military leadership, international diplomacy, a pre-existing political culture, and emancipation. Blight warns, however, that we cannot forget the battlefield, and, to this end, concludes his lecture with a discussion of the decisive Union victories at Gettysburg and Vicksburg in July of 1863.

Assignment

Drew G. Faust, Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War

Gary Gallagher, The Confederate War: How Popular Will, Nationalism, and Military Strategy Could Not Stave Off Defeat

Course Media

Transcript

html

Audio

mp3

Low Bandwidth Video

mov [100MB]

High Bandwidth Video

mov [500MB]