HSAR 252 - Lecture 6 - Habitats at Herculaneum and Early Roman Interior Decoration

Lecture 6 - Habitats at Herculaneum and Early Roman Interior Decoration

Overview

Professor Kleiner discusses domestic architecture at Herculaneum and the First and Second Styles of Roman wall painting. The lecture begins with an introduction to the history of the city of Herculaneum and what befell some of its inhabitants when they tried to escape obliteration by Vesuvius. She features three houses in Herculaneum, two of which--the Houses of the Mosaic Atrium and the Stags--are among the best examples of a residential style popular in Campania between A.D. 62 and 79. Professor Kleiner then turns to the First or Masonry Style of Roman wall painting, which seeks to replicate the built architecture of Hellenistic kings and other elite patrons by using stucco and paint to imitate a real wall faced with marble. She follows with Second Style Roman wall painting, which uses only paint to open up the wall illusionistically onto vistas and prospects of sacred shrines, city scenes, and landscapes. The lecture concludes with a discussion of the Garden Room from the Villa of Livia at Primaporta, which epitomizes the Second Style by transforming the flat wall into a panoramic window.

Resources


The lectures in HSAR 252 are illustrated with over 1,500 images, many from Professor Kleiner's personal collection, along with others from a variety of sources, especially Wikimedia Commons, Google Earth, and Yale University Press. Some plans and views have been redrawn for this project.

Assignment

Claridge, Amanda.Rome, pp. 49 (interior decoration), 130 (House of Augustus), 135 (House of the Griffins)

Ward-Perkins, John B.Roman Imperial Architecture, pp. 185-195

Course Media

Transcript

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Audio

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High Bandwidth Video

mov [500MB]