CHEM 125a - Lecture 20 - Rise of the Atomic Theory (1790-1805)

Lecture 20 - Rise of the Atomic Theory (1790-1805)

Overview

This lecture traces the development of elemental analysis as a technique for the determination of the composition of organic compounds beginning with Lavoisier's early combustion and fermentation experiments, which showed a new, if naïve, attitude toward handling experimental data. Dalton's atomic theory was consistent with the empirical laws of definite, equivalent, and multiple proportions. The basis of our current notation and of precise analysis was established by Berzelius, but confusion about atomic weight multiples, which could have been clarified early by the law of Avogadro and Gay-Lussac, would persist for more than half a century.

Resources

Professor McBride's web resources for CHEM 125 (Fall 2008)

http://webspace.yale.edu/chem125_oyc/#L20

This website may include third-party materials pertaining to relevant topics, provided for the user's convenience. Yale does not control or take responsibility for the content of any off-site pages or linked sites.

Assignment

Reading assignments, problem sets, PowerPoint presentations, and other resources for this lecture can be accessed from Professor McBride's on-campus course website, which was developed for his Fall 2008 students. Please see Resources section below.

Course Media

Transcript

html

Audio

mp3

Low Bandwidth Video

mov [100MB]

High Bandwidth Video

mov [500MB]